Malayan Weasel (Mustela nudipes)

 

Description:

HB: 300-360;

T:240-260; HF: 49-55; E: 23-24; W: 1-3 kg.

M. nudipes is a typical weasel, with variable body colouration from pale greyish white to reddish brown and a head which is much lighter than the body. The tails of the young have white tips. The female has 4 mammae. The soles of the feet are naked around the pads. As in M. sibirica the post orbital area is long and parallel sided, but the occipital crests form a curved line. The sagittal crest is small. As in strigidorsa the baculum is bifid at the tip, but the tip is hammer shaped rather than sharply curved

Range Description:

 This species is found in Southern Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia (Sumatra, Borneo) and Brunei (Duckworth et al. 2006). Confusion about the existence of this species on Java is due to an error in the original description, which is occasionally still repeated today, e.g. by Wilson and Reeder (2005), where the heliotype was said to come from Java (Duckworth et al. 2006). An individual from southern Thailand was collected at Khao Chong, Trang Province (Lekagul and McNeely 1977), also recently recorded records (about 5) extend the known range farther north (Specimen in Thailand Institute of Science and Technical Research), up to 10 degrees North Latitude (Duckworth et al. 2006). This species was recorded from Kerinci Seblat National Park in Sumatra in 1994, at altitudes of 400 m and 800 m (Franklin and Wells, 2005). Attitudinally wide-ranging, with records up to 1,700 m (Payne et al. 1985, Duckworth et al. 2006), with many records up to 1,400 m (Duckworth et al. 2006). There are wide-spread records of this species on Borneo, across the island both historically and recently, as well as on Sumatra (Duckworth et al. 2006).
Countries: Native:
Brunei Darussalam; Indonesia (Kalimantan, Sumatera); Malaysia (Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, Sarawak); Thailand

 Population:

There are no studies on this species, however, it appears to be widespread but difficult to see, at low density, and/or patchily distributed. This species has not been camera trapped regularly, as there is currently only one known record of camera trapping within the range, and the aggregate camera-trapping at known sites suggests that as currently used camera-traps are not an efficient way to find the species (Duckworth et al. 2006).
Population Trend: Decreasing

 Habitat and Ecology:

 Little is known about the habitat and ecology of this species, though it is probably similar to other weasels in that it is ground-dwelling and so potentially exposed to generalised snaring and other forms of trapping. However, the distribution of recent records in deforested areas, even urban sites, indicate a high tolerance to human activities (Duckworth et al. 2006). Little is known about the habitat and ecology of this species, though it is probably similar to other weasels in that it is ground-dwelling and so potentially exposed to generalised snaring and other forms of trapping. However, the distribution of recent records in deforested areas, even urban sites, indicate a high tolerance to human activities (Duckworth et al. 2006).
Systems: Terrestrial

 Major Threat(s):

 Currently no major threats to this species have been traced. It is eaten in parts of Sarawak and there is some evidence of medicinal use, but no evidence that these activities are major threats (Duckworth et al. 2006)..

 Conservation Actions:

This species is protected in Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah, but not in Sarawak nor in Indonesia (based ARCBC database). This species has been reported from many protected areas within its range (Duckworth et al. (2006).

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